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You’ve just landed your first managerial role, and you’re equal parts excited and terrified. Whether you were promoted from an associate-level position or hired as an external candidate, you know this is the greatest challenge of your career to date.

Of course, you want to be successful in this role, but you’re not exactly sure how to get started. Here’s some advice to help you navigate your first days, weeks, and months as the boss.

Get on the Same Page With Your Team

You’re anxious about being a new manager, but your employees are also nervous about having a new boss. Hold a team meeting to discuss this change and plan to move forward together. . Acknowledge that you work differently from their previous manager so that the transition phase will be an adjustment for everyone. Set expectations for the future and address any concerns they have, ease their minds, and truly begin functioning as a team.

Start Acting Like a Boss

This is the first time you’ve led the team. Instead of being part of the chorus, you’re now the person your employees look to for guidance. This means you need to lead by example, so previous behaviors like engaging in office gossip and being close friends with team members can no longer happen. No doubt, this will be a transition initially, but employees want a boss they look up to, who treats everyone fairly.

Develop Strategies to Combat Resistance

Some employees automatically give their boss respect, but others aren’t so easy to manage. For example, if you’re now leading a team you used to be part of, or if some of your direct reports are older than you, people might have trouble coming to terms with the fact that you’re the boss now.

Anticipate this behavior, so you’ll be prepared to combat it. Meet individually with those struggling to see you as their manager to find out what you can do to ease their transition. Help them see you’re serious about being a leader by sharing your goals and overall vision. Time should bring them around, but if not, you might have to make some staffing changes eventually.

Don’t Rush to Make Your Mark

Many first-time managers make the mistake of coming in on their first day and changing everything. This is counterproductive for many reasons, including the stress it causes employees and the fact that changing some long-standing processes will hinder the team’s success.

You’ll have plenty of time to put your stamp on the team, so ease into it. Take the time to observe what’s going on, so you can make meaningful changes that will truly improve the team.

As a new manager, hiring your first employee is a huge deal. PrideStaff Dallas wants to help you find the perfect fit for your team, so contact us today to discuss a partnership!

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